User Tools

Site Tools


0qu

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
Last revision Both sides next revision
0qu [2018/02/02 20:41]
admin
0qu [2018/02/03 10:34]
admin
Line 18: Line 18:
 |1838|Guest\\ //*19thC *annwfn//| ‘Annwvyn, or Annwn is frequently rendered “Hell,” though, the Lower Regions would more aptly express the meaning the name conveys.’ (Guest, p. 289, Endn. to p. 14.| |1838|Guest\\ //*19thC *annwfn//| ‘Annwvyn, or Annwn is frequently rendered “Hell,” though, the Lower Regions would more aptly express the meaning the name conveys.’ (Guest, p. 289, Endn. to p. 14.|
 |1839 27 April|Guest\\ //*19thC\\ *journal//​|'​I cannot endure anything in a second grade. I am happy to see we are at the head of the iron trade. Otherwise I could not take pride in my house in the City and my Works at Dowlais, and glory (playfully) in being (in some sort) a tradeswoman. Then again, my blood is of the noblest and most princely in the Kingdom, and if I go into Society, it must be the very best and first. I can brook no other. If I occupy myself in writing, my book must be splendidly got up and must be, as far at least as decoration and typography are concerned, at the head of literature'​. (S.Davies, '​Guest',​ p. 170| |1839 27 April|Guest\\ //*19thC\\ *journal//​|'​I cannot endure anything in a second grade. I am happy to see we are at the head of the iron trade. Otherwise I could not take pride in my house in the City and my Works at Dowlais, and glory (playfully) in being (in some sort) a tradeswoman. Then again, my blood is of the noblest and most princely in the Kingdom, and if I go into Society, it must be the very best and first. I can brook no other. If I occupy myself in writing, my book must be splendidly got up and must be, as far at least as decoration and typography are concerned, at the head of literature'​. (S.Davies, '​Guest',​ p. 170|
-|1867|Arnold\\ ​ //*19thC\\ *status//​|'​The very first thing that strikes one, in reading the Mabinogion, is how evidently the mediaeval storyteller is pillaging an antiquity of which he does not fully possess the secret; he is like a peasant building his hut on the site of Halicarnassus or Ephesus; he builds, but what he builds is full of materials of which he knows not the history, or knows by a glimmering tradition merely — stones "not of this building,"​ but of an older architecture,​ greater, cunninger, more majestical. In the medieval stories of no Latin or Teutonic people does this strike one as in those of the Welsh.'​ (Part II, p. 61.)|+|1867|Arnold\\ ​ //*19thC\\ *status//​|'​The very first thing that strikes one, in reading the Mabinogion, is how evidently the mediaeval storyteller is pillaging an antiquity of which he does not fully possess the secret; he is like a peasant building his hut on the site of Halicarnassus or Ephesus; he builds, but what he builds is full of materials of which he knows not the history, or knows by a glimmering tradition merely — stones "not of this building,"​ but of an older architecture,​ greater, cunninger, more majestical. In the medieval stories of no Latin or Teutonic people does this strike one as in those of the Welsh.'​ (Part II, p. 61.) See WJG challenge, & Jones equiv.|
 |1901|Anwyl\\ //​*coherent\\ *style//​|The Mabinogi 'form a unified whole, worked together with considerable skill by a writer to whom the materials seem to have been thoroughly familiar from frequent narration'​. (Part IV, p. 123)| |1901|Anwyl\\ //​*coherent\\ *style//​|The Mabinogi 'form a unified whole, worked together with considerable skill by a writer to whom the materials seem to have been thoroughly familiar from frequent narration'​. (Part IV, p. 123)|
 |1911|Lloyd,​ E.J.\\ ​ //*annwfn *death//​|'​Annwn is the Celtic paradise, whose inhabitants possess a higher civilisation,​ and whence come the blessings of this world. The first, and only, reference to Annwn is found in Pwyll ... The inhabitants of Annwn are described as having the same pursuits as the dwellers of the upper world, to which they apparently have free access, and it is even possible for mortals such as Pwyll to sojourn in the mysterious other-world of Annwn occasionally. Perhaps the beautiful white dogs with red (p. 244) ears, which are described in the story of Pwyll, are those known in folklore as Cwn Annwn. There is no suggestion in the Mabinogion that the dwellers of Annwn had anything necessarily to do with the spirits of the dead' (pp. 243-44)| |1911|Lloyd,​ E.J.\\ ​ //*annwfn *death//​|'​Annwn is the Celtic paradise, whose inhabitants possess a higher civilisation,​ and whence come the blessings of this world. The first, and only, reference to Annwn is found in Pwyll ... The inhabitants of Annwn are described as having the same pursuits as the dwellers of the upper world, to which they apparently have free access, and it is even possible for mortals such as Pwyll to sojourn in the mysterious other-world of Annwn occasionally. Perhaps the beautiful white dogs with red (p. 244) ears, which are described in the story of Pwyll, are those known in folklore as Cwn Annwn. There is no suggestion in the Mabinogion that the dwellers of Annwn had anything necessarily to do with the spirits of the dead' (pp. 243-44)|
Line 35: Line 35:
 |1911|Lloyd,​ E.J.\\ //*social status//​|'​the importance placed upon rank. Thus in the encounter between Pwyll and Arawn, we observe the deference with which Pwyll treats Arawn when he learns his status, and later when Pwyll visits Annwn in the guise of Arawn, he is received and attended to by pages and two knights, and we are told further that they sit at table in order of rank, an allusion which is also found in the account of Branwen'​s marriage feast at Aberffraw ... Rhiannon considers it unseemly that a lady of her position should argue with low and unprincipled women.'​ (p. 236) '​Manawyddan is repeatedly told how very unbecoming it is for a man of his rank to condescend to punish the mouse that has offended him.' )p. 240) Manawydan| |1911|Lloyd,​ E.J.\\ //*social status//​|'​the importance placed upon rank. Thus in the encounter between Pwyll and Arawn, we observe the deference with which Pwyll treats Arawn when he learns his status, and later when Pwyll visits Annwn in the guise of Arawn, he is received and attended to by pages and two knights, and we are told further that they sit at table in order of rank, an allusion which is also found in the account of Branwen'​s marriage feast at Aberffraw ... Rhiannon considers it unseemly that a lady of her position should argue with low and unprincipled women.'​ (p. 236) '​Manawyddan is repeatedly told how very unbecoming it is for a man of his rank to condescend to punish the mouse that has offended him.' )p. 240) Manawydan|
 |1911|Lloyd,​ E.J.\\ //*social status\\ *ruler//​|'​the nobles taking counsel together to ask Pwyll to divorce his wife because she was childless is an interesting indication of the way the government of the country was carried on, as it proves that the prince was not an absolute ruler, for Pwyll does not deny their right to advise him in this way' (p. 237)| |1911|Lloyd,​ E.J.\\ //*social status\\ *ruler//​|'​the nobles taking counsel together to ask Pwyll to divorce his wife because she was childless is an interesting indication of the way the government of the country was carried on, as it proves that the prince was not an absolute ruler, for Pwyll does not deny their right to advise him in this way' (p. 237)|
 +|1912|WJG\\ //​*status//​|Challenges Arnold. 'So with the author of the Mabinogion, many were called to labour, a whole nation of historians, story-tellers and bards, but only one was chosen to raise the superstructure,​ and to see that every stone, laid by the hands of those who knew not how their neighbours were working, fitted its position and filled its place in this enormous and intricate building. Herein Matthew Arnold, in the simile already quoted, does the greater builder no little injustice. He was no peasant building his hut out of the material of ruined temples ; he was rather building the temple of a new and infinitely greater cult, using the stones which generations of toilers had moved from buried shrines. In this sense, the Mabinogion are doubly national.'​ (1912, //Cymm//. p. 54)|
 |1929|Ellis & Lloyd\\ //*critique Guest//​|'​The intention of Lady Charlotte Guest appears to have been to produce a version which could be used for the instruction and amusement of her own children, with the result that parts of her translation are either inaccurate or bowdlerised.'​ (p. viii)| |1929|Ellis & Lloyd\\ //*critique Guest//​|'​The intention of Lady Charlotte Guest appears to have been to produce a version which could be used for the instruction and amusement of her own children, with the result that parts of her translation are either inaccurate or bowdlerised.'​ (p. viii)|
 |1929|Ellis & Lloyd\\ //*annwfn\\ *death *gods//​|Annwfn ‘originally conceived of as the abode of the gods, a pleasant, rich country, full of everything a man might need’ (p. 3) Welsh Hades, the abode of the dead. (p. 7, n. 15) Critiqued by Ifor Williams review| |1929|Ellis & Lloyd\\ //*annwfn\\ *death *gods//​|Annwfn ‘originally conceived of as the abode of the gods, a pleasant, rich country, full of everything a man might need’ (p. 3) Welsh Hades, the abode of the dead. (p. 7, n. 15) Critiqued by Ifor Williams review|
 |1948|Jones & Jones\\ //*critique Guest//​|Guest'​s text is ‘but a paraphrase’ and ‘not the beauties of the original.'​ (pp. 5-6)| |1948|Jones & Jones\\ //*critique Guest//​|Guest'​s text is ‘but a paraphrase’ and ‘not the beauties of the original.'​ (pp. 5-6)|
 +|1948|Jones & Jones\\ //​*status//​|Initially approves Arnold, but salvages national pride; alludes to Horace: ​ ‘natural and pious as it is to lament our lost heritage of story, we contemplate with the more pride and affection such treasures as are so happily preserved to us in the White Book and the Red.’ (p. xi) ‘artifex of a monument more lasting than brass, a classic of European literature, a glory of the Celtic world.'​ [cf. Horace ’I have erected a monument more lasting than brass, and loftier than the kingly elevation of pyramids’](p. xviii)|
 |1974|Bollard\\ //​*coherent//​|'​There is no incident or detail which remains isolated or superfluous in the Four Branches.'​ (In Sullivan, p. 168)| |1974|Bollard\\ //​*coherent//​|'​There is no incident or detail which remains isolated or superfluous in the Four Branches.'​ (In Sullivan, p. 168)|
 |1974|Bollard\\ //​*coherent\\ *structure//​|'​the author has utilized his material to create a work that is both meaningful and artistically unified. The intricate structure which can be seen throughout the Mabinogi is very closely woven, yet the author has sufficient control over his materials and over his own artistry to prevent the tales from becoming too complex in their interrelationships.'​ (In Sullivan, p. 192)| |1974|Bollard\\ //​*coherent\\ *structure//​|'​the author has utilized his material to create a work that is both meaningful and artistically unified. The intricate structure which can be seen throughout the Mabinogi is very closely woven, yet the author has sufficient control over his materials and over his own artistry to prevent the tales from becoming too complex in their interrelationships.'​ (In Sullivan, p. 192)|
0qu.txt · Last modified: 2018/02/03 18:11 by admin